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Research Overview

Research Topics

  • Pathophysiology of Angle Closure Glaucoma (ACG) and Improving Care of ACG Patients
  • Advanced Anterior Segment Imaging Modalities to Study Physiological and Biomechanical Properties of Intraocular Structures and Aqueous Outflow Pathways

Ongoing Projects

Current projects include:

Project 1: Development and Validation of OCT-based Methods to Detect and Manage Primary Angle Closure Disease

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Project 1: Development and Validation of OCT-based Methods to Detect and Manage Primary Angle Closure Disease

Primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) is a leading cause of permanent vision loss worldwide, affecting an estimated 16 million people. It is the most severe stage of primary angle closure disease (PACD) and is preceded by primary angle closure suspect (PACS) and primary angle closure (PAC). The primary risk factor for developing PACG is closure of the anterior chamber angle (ACA), which impairs aqueous humor outflow from the eye and elevates intraocular pressure (IOP).

Early and accurate identification of individuals with risk factors for PACD is crucial to prevent PACG-related vision loss. Currently, gonioscopy is the clinical standard for evaluating the ACA and diagnosing angle closure, but it has several limitations. Gonioscopy is a subjective assessment method that requires considerable examiner expertise and is associated with high inter-observer variability.

Figure 1: Optical coherence tomography is based on the principle of low-coherence interferometry and relies on the backscattering of light as it travels through various tissue structures. Infrared light is emitted by a light source and reflected by the material or tissue that it travels through. Back reflected light is detected by a sensor, which then compares this with light from a reference beam.

Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) is a non-contact in vivo imaging method that produces qualitative images and quantitative measurements of anterior segment structures, including the ACA. The primary benefit of using AS-OCT imaging in diagnostic PACD is the development and validation of new clinical methods to detect and manage patients with PACD.

Figure 2: Image taken with the Tomey Casia SS-1000 anterior segment optical coherence tomography device. The cornea (C), iris (I), lens (L), scleral spur (SS, yellow arrows) and anterior chamber angle (A) are marked for reference.

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Project 3: Name

Funding